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Honoré Jaxon: Prairie Visionary

by Donald Smith

Honoré Jaxon: Prairie Visionary
The first definitive biorgraphy of this complex political man who went from Ontario Orangeman to Louis Riel's secretary during the Resistance.

Born in Toronto to a Methodist family and raised in Wingham, Ontario, William Henry Jackson attended the University of Toronto before moving to Prince Albert, where he began to sympathize with the Métis and their struggle against the Canadian government. Jackson became personal secretary to Louis Riel, was captured by the Canadian militia during the 1885 Resistance, and was convicted of treason and sentenced to an insane asylum near Winnipeg. When he escaped to the United States, joining the labour union movement, he told everyone that he was Métis and modified his name to the Métis-sounding Honoré Jaxon.

After a lively career as a politically radical public figure in Chicago - where he befriended, among others, the revolutionary architect Frank Lloyd Wright - Jaxon eventually moved to New York City to attempt life as a real estate developer. His ongoing project was to collect as many books, newspapers and pamphlets relating to the Métis people as possible, in an attempt to establish a library for their use. However, he was evicted from his basement apartment at the age of ninety. His entire collection was dispersed, most of it to the New York City garbage dump, the remainder sold. He died a month later, in early 1952.

Honoré Jaxon: Prairie Visionary completes Donald Smith's "Prairie Imposters" popular history trilogy concerning three prominent figures who all pretended a native ancestry they did not, in fact, possess - Honoré Jaxon, Grey Owl, and Long Lance.

DETAILS

ISBN
9781550503678
Size
6" x 9" 312 pages
Ages:
Adult
Price
24.95 CDN; 22.95 USD
E-Book Price
CDN; USD
Categories
Historical Biography Tradepaper Adult
Author
Donald Smith
Author Photo

About the Author

Honoré Jaxon: Prairie Visionary completes Donald Smith's "Prairie Imposters" popular history trilogy concerning three prominent figures who all pretended a native ancestry they did not, in fact, possess - Honoré Jaxon, Grey Owl, and Long Lance.

In addition to his Native History biographies, Donald B. Smith has co-edited such books as The New Provinces, Alberta and Saskatchewan, 1905-1980 (with the late Howard Palmer), and Centennial City: Calgary 1894-1994. His popular articles have appeared in a variety of local and national publications including Alberta History, The Beaver, the Globe and Mail, and the Calgary Herald. With Douglas Francis and Richard Jones, he published the popular two volume history text, Origins, and Destinies, and the single-volume history of Canada, titled Journeys. He has also published Calgary's Grand Story, a history of twentieth century Calgary from the vantage point of two heritage buildings in the city, the Lougheed Building and Grand Theatre, both constructed in 1911/1912.

Born in Toronto in 1946, Dr. Smith was raised in Oakville, Ontario. He obtained his BA and PhD at the University of Toronto, and his M.A. at the Université Laval. He has taught Canadian History at the University of Calgary since 1974, focusing on Canadian history in general, and on Native History, Quebec, and the Canadian North in particular. His research has primarily been in the field of Native History, combined with a strong interest in Alberta history.

Awards

Shortlisted, Wilfred Eggleston Award for Non-Fiction, Alberta Literary Awards

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